Category: Public Relations

Content Marketing Digital PR Public Relations SEO Social Media

What Our Search Behaviors Signify About The Future of PR

(Nerd post alert. Endorsed and paid for by Carrie’s Inner Geek.)

Well, this is rather interesting!! I thought I’d take a quick look at Google Trends to come up with new keywords (blog inspiration!).

First, I searched trends on content marketing.

 

Looks promising, right? The growth is a bit obvious, since everyone is buzzing about content marketing like it’s Columbus arriving at the New World. Add in the projected explosion in content creation over the next five-plus years, it’s no surprise to see an upward trend.

But then I added in public relations, social media and search engine optimization (SEO) – the other three key components of digital PR – just for comparison purposes.

Which areas are generating the most online search activity? The results surprised me.

Public Relations Social Media

Vanity Metrics Turn Breaking News Into A Giant Popularity Contest

I came across this interesting infographic (below) from BusinessWire this morning.

I’d seen it before, but here’s what struck me about it this time: publications are using vanity metrics to determine if a story is successful or not. It’s a simple metric – easy to track.

What does that actually mean? They like successful stories – who doesn’t – so when something generates a nice amount of comments, likes and shares, they produce more content that is similar to what was successful.

These are vanity metrics, and a great explanation for why breaking news is gradually becoming more about repurposing entertainment currently popular on social media, instead of local news. It’s a place to get instant feedback on vanity metrics – real-time reactions. Stations can see what is already popular and trending on social media, then pop it on the news that same day. It’s proven successful by another publisher, making it an easy win for vanity metrics.

It’s the news equivalent of clickbait. News is being determined by what is already popular (sometimes on a national scale), instead of what is important locally, instead of what drives important, MEANINGFUL change.

Public Relations

Learn Insanely Awesome Copywriting Skills Through Osmosis

Well, not really – but you’ll be amazed what kind of magical wizardry your copywriting skills suddenly gain, just by glancing over these three SlideShare decks.

Really. Take a look.

If they don’t inspire you, I’ll eat my socks.

1. The 10 Best Copywriting Formulas for Social Media Headlines from Buffer

 

2. The secret psychology of persuasive copy (Conversion Conference – Las Vegas 2015) from Nathalie Nahai

 

3. 17 Copywriting Do’s and Don’ts: How To Write Persuasive Content from Henneke Duistermaat

I don’t think I’ll lose this deal, but if  I do have to eat my socks, perchance, they’ll be the ones made of fruit leather. Cherry fruit leather.

It’s a good thing I don’t live in Seattle. Rain really can wreak havoc on fruit leather.

On a more serious note – what skill is more useful in marketing than having a talent for writing? Social media, content marketing, PR – it’s essential, no matter what role you fill or how many years you have (or don’t have) under your belt. It’s certainly one of those skills worth improving, perhaps even deserving of an hour or so a week.

If you aren’t constantly writing (and improving your writing) during your day job, I highly recommend using long-form posts on LinkedIn and blogging for your personal brand as a FANTASTIC way to grow your writing skills. (Hint, hint, nudge, nudge.)

 

Digital PR Public Relations

The Often-Overlooked PR Gold Mine: Online Public Speaking

It’s easy to fall into the habit of looking for the more traditional PR placements – press release pick-ups, bylines, guest blog posts… But public relations opportunities aren’t limited to editorial.

What better way to build visibility and relationships with a specific target audience than landing speaking opportunities? It builds credibility and influence, plus it’s fantastic for generating leads. In fact, some use it as their primary lead generation tool or a valued revenue stream, and the PR agency or employee that can generate active leads is an extremely valuable part of the team. (This impacts client retention or job security nicely – whoot!).

There’s a gold mine of opportunities waiting for you. If you haven’t added them to your overall strategy, now’s the perfect time to take a closer look, and be proactive bringing up this tactic before it’s requested.
[Tweet “Webinars, chats and podcasts are amazing sources of #PR visibility – seek them out!”]
For agencies, the research can also be a nice way to upsell an extra project fee that is worth every single penny to their client, or a value-add to wrap into an existing retainer as time allows. And for in-house PR pros, it can be a project that has a major pay-off in bringing you to the attention of company leadership.

Most people who handle traditional public relations think of speaking opportunities – but they overlook the ONLINE SPEAKING opportunities: webinars, podcasts, Twitter chats and Google hangouts. They are all viable speaking opportunities and essential ways to build visibility online. They also give significant credibility to the speaker and build their reputation as a sought-after expert in their industry, in exactly the same way speaking does but with a potentially larger audience.

Public Relations Rock The Pitch SEO

Blogger Pitch Smackdown: SEO Linkbuilders vs. PR Pros

The Differences in Pitch Style & Purpose Are Helpful to Understand
I love PR, I love SEO and I really love how well they intersect to grow client reach and conversion.

So when pitch samples hit my desk for my bad pitch column, Rock The Pitch, or I get pitched myself as a blogger, I know instantly where it’s coming from: a PR professional, a business owner/entrepreneur or someone trying to get an SEO backlink.

How that pitch is written can be VERY revealing. Motives are similar – a chance to publish a guest post or article – but many tend to follow an all-too-common, copy and paste template that reveals their true purpose behind the pitch.
[Tweet “Sadly, it’s rare to get a pitch that is specific, interesting and relevant.”]
I believe this is less about PR pros and more about WHO ELSE sends pitches. It’s not a practice exclusive to public relations specialists like it used to be.

Why do I write about backlink pitches in a PR blog? Because journalists complain about the quality of a pitch and attribute it to lazy PR pros when it isn’t actually coming from a PR professional (not that we don’t screw up, too), and PR pros scorn pitches on their client blogs mentioning money or compensation.

Both criticize or laugh about how bad the pitch is, without realizing where it’s coming from or the motivator behind it.